Sara Beth Karp
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Sara Beth Karp, MD

Coordinator Practice Management, QI, and Colposcopy
University of California, Davis School of Medicine
Lancaster General Hospital Family Practice Residency

Originally from New York City, Dr. Karp has spent time living in California, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts before returning to New York in 2010. She was a faculty member at Tufts University Family Medicine Residency, where she served s the residency’s Director of Predoctoral Education for 14 years. Her interests include Women’s Health and Practice Management. She is an instructor for the ALSO (Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics) and NRP (Neonatal Resuscitation Program) courses. She lives in Manhattan with husband Bruce, who is also a physician, and her two teenage sons. Dr. Karp enjoys reading, cooking, and spending time with her family.


Spotlight:

Originally from New York City, Sara Karp, MD, has spent time living in California, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts before returning to New York in 2010. She was a faculty member at Tufts University Family Medicine Residency, where she served as the residency’s director of predoctoral education for 14 years. At the Institute she has been instrumental in making colposcopies widely available to patients. Her interests include women’s health and practice management.

What do you like about teaching residents?

When I teach, I also have the ability to not only help my own patients, but also to impact my residents’ patients as they move forward, and that is very rewarding.

What inspires you to work at the Institute?

At the Institute you get to work with so many people – physicians, administrators, allied health staff, social workers –who all believe in the mission. Everyone feels that patients deserve excellent health care no matter who they are. To be in a place that has that idealism is very energizing.

What is unique about working with the Institute’s patients in New York City?

Some of our patients who have enormous financial and psychosocial burdens and can’t always do the things they need to do to take care of themselves, and it can be hard to watch. How do you support a patient? How do you help patients move toward better self-care and follow-up? A patient may not come for an important follow-up test and you call them, send them a letter, offer them another appointment and try to figure out the barriers – is it transportation? Time? Their housing situation? This isn’t all of our patients, but there is a sizeable portion who can’t ideally engage in their own health care because of the other chaos and difficulties in their lives. To get people the services they need and try to help them move forward is a challenge, but you do see change. Every day has successes and failures.